Podcast episode

Episode Sixty-Four – On Tribal Science – Interview With Michael McRae

Download the mp3 of this episode here!

FINALLY!

You have no idea how frustrating it can be with internet issues… well, maybe you do know. What’s worse is thinking that people will not like having several podcast episodes hit them in a row, because they’ve added up over three weeks! :/ Thanks for remaining as listeners, it’s really appreciated and I hope the updates have been of use in the meantime.

So, the next three days will be filled with content – you have been warned and I will be working on having alternative methods of getting shows out in the future! Essentially, just relying on one internet connection clearly doesn’t help with weekly shows, so I’ll have back-ups that are of shorter length that I can release without overloading my alternative ‘net connections.

But first – today’s episode!

Science is a tribal endeavor. It’s a social behavior humans engage in, one that is based on shared values of logic, reason, empiricism and the right to debate the merits of belief.

What are the ideals of the science methodology and what is the reality of how people actually use (or don’t use) their brains?

Michael McRae is an Australian science writer working for the CSIRO’s education department.

He graduated with a bachelor of applied science from QUT and followed this with several years as a medical scientist working for a Queensland pathology laboratory. With a Bachelor of Education in science and mathematics, he taught in Brisbane and then London. In 2006 he earned a Diploma of Science Communication via the joint ANU/Questacon ‘Science Circus’ program, and he is currently reading for his Masters in Culture, Health and Medicine at ANU.

In addition to all of that, he’s presented public talks on science history and philosophy, optical illusions, skepticism, communication and the nature of epistemology. He’s appeared twice before on the Token Skeptic podcast and his first book, ‘Tribal Science – Brains, Beliefs and Bad Ideas‘ is due for release in early 2011 through University Of Queensland Press.

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